Castle of Wizardry — David Eddings (Belgariad 4)

Already then! We have reached book 4 of the Belgariad series. See my previous posts on Pawn of Prophecy, Queen of Sorcery, and Magician’s Gambit for the Story So Far. See David Eddings’ Amazon page for some more background on the author (and use that link to purchase some books!)

Book 3, Magician’s Gambit, ended with Belgarath and Ctuchik fighting over the Orb of Aldur, and Ctuchik very foolishly trying to unmake the Orb, thereby angering the Universe, and causing himself to be unmade. (Don’t fear, if that didn’t make any sense, just know that the Universe takes the Principle of Conservation of Matter very seriously.) Garion feels that their epic quest is done, and life can get back to normal. He once again displays his complete inability to recognise the foreshadowing for the previous three books.

A long and mildly eventful journey to the Isle of Winds and the city of Riva ensues. Garion is forced to assume a leadership role, and Polgara and Belgarath are otherwise occupied and exhausted. Again, upon arrival to the ancient city and home of defenders of the west, Garion thinks that he’s done, a notion that is quickly disabused when he is crowned king over all. Yes, that’s right, all of that foreshadowing that was clear to absolutely everyone else came as a complete surprise to him. Ce’Nedra takes it quite badly, as prophecy indicates that upon her sixteenth birthday she is going to have to submit to the Rivan King and wed him. They are betrothed, but Belgarath and Belgarion (he can probably be considered to have earned his title as a sorcerer by now) recognise that the rest of the prophecy (that Torak and Belgarion will eventually duel for the fates of the world) means that it might be convenient to escape and attempt to resolve the prophecy. Ce’Nedra finally recognises her part in the prophecy, and the final pieces move into place for the resolution.

So, I recognise that I’ve been a bit uneven with my summaries of this series, and this summary was a little longer than some of the others. My opinion still stands–the series is fun, light, fairly straightforward, but quite readable.

Amazon links!

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