Some Buried Caesar (Rex Stout) — A Nero Wolfe novel

Some Buried Caesar is the sixth Nero Wolfe novel by Rex Stout. It was published in an abridged form in 1938, and released as a novel in 1939.

I’ve reviewed Rex Stout novels in the past. Borrowing the author bio I’ve previously used: Rex Stout (mainly cribbed from his Wikipedia page) was an American writer noted for his detective fiction. He is best remembered for his creation of Nero Wolfe (more on him in a moment). He started his writing career with serialised novels in various magazines, which were not in the detective genre. He dabbled in crime, scientific romance, fantasy, and historical fiction, before settling into what would define his career. He was elected the president of the Mystery Writers of America in 1958, and received their Grand Master Award a year later. He received the Silver Dagger Aware from the Crime Writers Association in 1969. (His Amazon page.)

Nero Wolfe is an armchair detective of the Hercule Poirot or Sherlock Holmes variety. He is supported by his assistant Archie Goodwin, who also narrates the cases of the detective (playing Watson to Nero’s Holmes, of course). He is not portrayed as a likeable character–he is obstinate, obese, refuses to leave the house except under exceptional circumstances, drinks heavily, and is singly devoted to the study and care of orchids.

The title is a reference to Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 2:

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interrèd with their bones.
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
For Brutus is an honorable man;
So are they all, all honorable men—
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill.

(I’m aware that I didn’t need to include the entire quote, but it’s such good writing that I hope that you indulge me.)

Nero Wolfe and his companion/bodyguard/private detective Archie Goodwin are on the way to an agricultural show where they intend to display Wolfe’s beloved orchids. There is a good reason that they are breaking Wolfe’s cardinal rule to never travel out of Manhattan, as he intends to win the orchid competition, thereby putting one over a rival. Unfortunately, due to a tyre blow-out, Archie crashes their car, and they are forced to walk to a nearby house to telephone for assistance. They cut across a pasture where they are threatened by a large bull. It is this bull, Hickory Caesar Grindon, that is the titular character of the story. The house that they travel to is owned by Thomas Pratt, who is planning an incredible publicity stunt for his chain of fast food restaurants by barbequing and eat the champion bull, Caesar. There is a tremendous amount of uproar about this, with breeders and stockmen aghast at the waste of potential.

The bull is implicated in the goring murder of a man, and then found to have anthrax in his system, and is quickly killed and cremated, thereby destroying any potential evidence as to whether he was responsible or not for the death of the man. Archie is vaguely interested in the outcome, as he was theoretically on guard when the murder occurred, but Wolfe has minimal interest in interfering, as he suspects that it will delay his desired return to the comforts of home in Manhatten. The plot develops nicely, with plenty of potential clues scattered about for the reader, and plenty of red herrings too.

Needless to say, with a tremendous amount of ego on the part of Wolfe, and hard work and effort on the part of Archie, the true murderer is uncovered, the local authorities are shown to be incompetent, and some minor romantic comedy is managed.

It’s fine. Honestly, it is. I stand by my previous assessment that the Stout/Wolfe books are quite even in quality, and a blanket recommendation is appropriate.

Too Many Cooks (Rex Stout) — A Nero Wolfe novel

Too Many Cooks is the fifth Nero Wolfe novel by Rex Stout (Amazon Link). It was published in 1938 as both a novel and as a serial.

Rex Stout (mainly cribbed from his Wikipedia page) was an American writer noted for his detective fiction. He is best remembered for his creation of Nero Wolfe (more on him in a moment). He started his writing career with serialised novels in various magazines, which were not in the detective genre. He dabbled in crime, scientific romance, fantasy, and historical fiction, before settling into what would define his career. He was elected the president of the Mystery Writers of America in 1958, and received their Grand Master Award a year later. He received the Silver Dagger Aware from the Crime Writers Association in 1969. (His Amazon page.)

Nero Wolfe is an armchair detective of the Hercule Poirot or Sherlock Holmes variety. He is supported by his assistant Archie Goodwin, who also narrates the cases of the detective (playing Watson to Nero’s Holmes, of course). He is not portrayed as a likeable character–he is obstinate, obese, refuses to leave the house except under exceptional circumstances, drinks heavily, and is singly devoted to the study and care of orchids.

Detective novels are difficult. There is an expectation that the author will provide the reader with sufficient hints and clues to solve the mystery. But, it cannot be obvious or blatant. There must be sufficient material, red herrings, that the reader is off-balance and cannot commit to a theory. There are authors (Agatha Christie and Arthur Conan Doyle, for example) who keep a little too much from the reader so that at the end of the novel you are a little frustrated that the clues weren’t presented reasonably to you. (There is an alternative explanation: I’m not very good at spotting the clues, and am somewhat oblivious!)

Nero Wolfe, detective extraordinaire, has been coaxed from New York by the only thing else he loves, gastronomy. The meeting of the Les Quinze Maîtres is convening in West Virginia, and Nero Wolfe has been invited to give the keynote speech, on the subject of American Haute Cuisine (possibly oxymoronic!) Sadly, cooks being the vindictive, petty egomaniacs that they are, one of them is promptly murdered. C’est la vie detective! Wolfe has little interest until a friend is arrested for the murder. He wishes to remain involved just long enough to exonerate his friend, deliver his speech, indulge in some light blackmail, and then depart for home. This, sadly, isn’t quite how it develops.

As with all of the Wolfe novels, the narrative is delivery by Wolfe’s bodyguard/gumshoe detective/bruiser/manservant Archie Goodwin. He has a good delivery, and enough humour and sarcasm to keep things moving.

Set in the 30s, written in 1938, the story is a product of its time. There is casual racism (this was West Virigina in the 30s after all!) and sexism. It’s eye-rolling-inducing, but raises the question of whether the time period should be factored into the review. I’m torn on this matter.

In small doses, Rex Stout and his quite objectionable lead character Nero Wolfe are quite enjoyable. I think I’ll drop something else into my reading queue before coming back to the series.

Recommended. Blanket recommendation on any of the Stout/Wolfe books, as they’re quite even in quality.

Ice Cold–Tess Gerritsen (Rizzoli & Isles 8)

Ice Cold (or The Killing Place) by Tess Gerritsen is book eight in the Rizzoli & Isles series.

Amazon DVD and Amazon Play links to the TV Series. Click on them. Buy stuff. Rizzoli & Isles First Season (Amazon Play) and on DVD. Rizzoli & Isles Season 2 DVDs and on Amazon Play. Rizzoli & Isles Season 3 DVDs and Amazon Play. Rizzoli & Isles Season 4 DVDs and Amazon Play. Rizzoli & Isles Season 5 on Amazon Play. Enough of that!

Author notes in brief: Tess Gerritsen is a living Chinese-American author writing romantic suspense and medical thrillers, as well as the Rizzoli & Isles series. Her Amazon page, Wikipedia page, and personal page have plenty of personal details. I have previous reviews of The Surgeon, The Apprentice, The Sinner, Body Double, Vanish, The Mephisto Club, and The Keepsake.

Again, I wasn’t very good at keeping notes for this one, which is something of a shame, as this book was a reasonable departure style-wise from the previous few novels. Dr Maura Isles, upset at the difficulties of having an illicit love affair with a catholic priest, takes up an offer of an impromptu ski trip after a medical conference with an old school friend, his daughter, as well as another couple. Unsurprisingly, things go quite wrong, with the car getting stuck in a snowstorm. They seek shelter at Kingdom Come, a religious community (a cult) that appears to have been very recently, very suddenly, abandoned.

Further disasters occur, with medical emergencies, one of their number trying to ski out for help, the inevitable “are we truly alone?” fears in this abandoned community, plus determining the truth behind the abandonment.

Up to this point, Detective Jane Rizzoli has nothing to do. This changes with news reaching Boston that the car has been found off the side of a cliff, with the burnt remains of Isles and her companions inside. Needless to say, this is just a red herring, but the local law enforcement and community, as well as the powerful religious leader (cult!) are determined to prevent the questions.

Stylistically, it’s a shake-up from the past few books, which is a point in its favour. It’s difficult to separate reviewing the book on its own merits from reviewing the book as part of the ongoing series. Each novel is sufficiently self-contained that a reader can pick up one at random and get the story and the backgrounds of the characters.

Body Double–Tess Gerritsen (Rizzoli & Isles 4)

Body Double, the fourth of the Rizzoli & Isles series by Tess Gerritsen.

Amazon DVD links to the TV Series. Click on them. Buy stuff. Rizzoli & Isles: The Complete First Season (Amazon Play) and Rizzoli & Isles: Season 1 (DVD). Rizzoli & Isles: Season 2 DVDs and Rizzoli & Isles: The Complete Second Season (Amazon Play). Ahem.

Author notes in brief: Tess Gerritsen is a living Chinese-American author. Her Amazon page, Wikipedia page, and personal page have plenty of personal details. I have previous reviews of The Surgeon, The Apprentice and The Sinner.

Hmmm. A lot of pregnancy in this one. And the meaning of family. The second of those points I can relate to. The former? Not so much. Again, the chief protagonist of this novel is Dr Maura Isles, with Detective Jane Rizzoli relegated to a more supporting role. Rizzoli is currently happily married, massively pregnant, and completely unwilling to compromise on, well, anything. After hints dropped in the last novel about Isles’ mysterious parentage (we knew that she was adopted, and very little else), this is essentially the focus of the novel. Her birth mother (or not, the story takes a pretty impressive twist) has been revealed to be a particularly unpleasant woman. Her murdered (twin?) sister was very likeable indeed, but unfortunately crime novels need a healthy supply of unhealthy acts. Pregnant women are being kidnapped, murdered, and the fetusses (fetii?) are being sold. Isles’ “family” are intimately tied up with this rather nasty business.

The majority of this novel was read on a train journey to and from Sydney. I went up for a tech expo. I have no buying power for my work for tech stuff, mind you, I was attending as a curious enthusiast, even if I have no need for POS machines, servers, embedded devices, marketing … stuff, 3D printing, connectivity, startups, and a crazy myriad of other things. This aside was brought to you by the ridiculous amount of sugar I consumed that day, and the effect it had on my note-taking ability.

The book was good. I remain a little squeamish about some of the surgery scenes. The characterisation is solid, the pacing steady, the romance not too intrusive (though Isles lusting after a priest is … odd. Disconcerting, even.)

Amazon linky

The Sinner–Tess Gerritsen (Rizzoli & Isles 3)

The Sinner by Tess Gerritsen, is the third book of the Rizzoli & Isles series.

Amazon DVD links to the TV Series. Click on them. Buy stuff. Rizzoli & Isles: The Complete First Season (Amazon Play) and Rizzoli & Isles: Season 1 (DVD) Alright, enough of that!

Author notes in brief: Tess Gerritsen is a living Chinese-American author. Her Amazon page, Wikipedia page, and personal page have plenty of personal details. (Of interest, her first name is actually Terry, but she feminized it when she was writing romance novels. Source.) She initially wrote Romantic Suspense, through the 80s to the mid-90s, changed to Medical Thrillers, before embarking in 2001 into Crime Thrillers with the (at time of writing) eleven-book series featuring Detective Jane Rizzoli and Dr Maura Isles.

The third of Gerritsen’s series of novels focusing on the Boston police department, detectives, medical examiners, murder and mayhem. Book 1 (The Surgeon) focused on Thomas Moore, with Detective Jane Rizzoli a secondary character, and Dr Maura Isles not appearing at all. Book 2 (The Apprentice) has Jane Rizzoli taking over protagonist duties, and the Queen of the Dead, Dr Maura Isles making her debut. Here, with the The Sinner, Isles is finally sharing co-star duties with Rizzoli.

Note how I said finally? I’m still expecting somehow that the novels will spontaneously acquire the characters of the TV series. It’s definitely not going to happen. The glossy TV versions are too far away from the flawed novel characters.

A brutal attack on two nuns has left one of them dead, and the other in a coma. It is the depths of winter, and everything and everyone is affected by the cold, the snow, and the ice. Dr Isles’ ex-husband returns, and manages to worm his way back into her life, much to her libido’s pleasure common sense’s horror. Detective Rizzoli is trying to convince herself that her affair with Gabriel Dean ending is for the best. A state of affairs complicated by a, uh, complication. The majority of the novel is much more complicated and nuanced than the romantic highlights I’m giving. A Jane Doe who was murdered and then dismembered was found to have leprosy, and probably had been present in a village massacre where one of the nuns was performing aid work. (Good grief that was a complicated sentence.) Isles’ ex-husband is connected as well.

The plotting is improved over the first two books. The characterisation is better too–the characters are better-described, more nuanced, and the story is more complex. Gerritsen still has moments where a scene plays out, and then the characters react to the scene, and there is something of a disconnect between the two. It’s clear that the reaction is what is required for narrative purposes, but the writing wasn’t quite there on the scene.

My mind wandered a bit whilst I was reading this. It’s A Wonderful Life and Slumdog Millionaire (snow and winter, and poverty in India, respectively). It was an odd combination to be sure. There was a lot of religion in general, and Catholicism in particular, which I have opinions on. These opinions vary dramatically given the day and the length of time it’s been since I read about any of the horrors committed by members of the clergy or in the name of the church.

The book ends in a most unexpected way. Not wishing to spoil anything, but Rizzoli’s complication could be quite dramatic, and Dean appears more permanently present.

Amazon linky!

The Apprentice–Tess Gerritsen (Rizzoli & Isles 2)

In brief: Second novel in the series by Tess Gerritsen focusing on the Boston police department homicide detectives. Again, my reading is a little perturbed by comparisons with the TV series, Rizzoli & Isles. (Y’know, here are some Amazon linkies. Rizzoli & Isles: The Complete First Season (Amazon Play) and Rizzoli & Isles: Season 1 (DVD))

Alright, enough shameless whoring of myself.

Author notes in brief: Tess Gerritsen is a living Chinese-American author. Her Amazon page, Wikipedia page, and personal page have plenty of personal details. (Of interest, her first name is actually Terry, but she feminized it when she was writing romance novels. Source.) She initially wrote Romantic Suspense, through the 80s to the mid-90s, changed to Medical Thrillers, before embarking in 2001 into Crime Thrillers with the (at time of writing) eleven-book series featuring Detective Jane Rizzoli and Dr Maura Isles.

Link to my review of The Surgeon by Tess Gerritsen.

Jane Rizzoli, a Boston Police Department homicide detective is struggling to prove that she is just as capable as her male counterparts. A new serial killer is sexually assaulting and murdering couples, and Rizzoli is lead on the investigation.

We are introduced to Dr. Maura Isles, the state medical examiner, who is portrayed as a gothic Queen of the Dead, nothing like her character in the TV Series. This was most disconcerting. I felt as though I knew these characters. Also introduced is Detective Vince Korsak, an overweight smoker with poor personal habits, again, not the friendly mentor character of the TV series. (I think the divergence between book and screen for Korsak was even more jarring than for Rizzoli or Isles.) The third new main character is FBI agent, Gabriel Deans, who has been assigned to the case directly from the Washington FBI office. Deans knows a lot more than he is letting on, and spends most of the book antagonising Rizzoli.

When the Surgeon, the killer from the first book, escapes from gaol (jail for any Americans reading this), he teams up with the new killer, and together they wreck havoc. Rizzoli is the target, and they are getting worryingly close.

The language and imagery is just as gruesome and graphic as the first book. There are passages that are not for the squeamish. There is also a lot of sexual politics and the challenges of being a female in a male-dominated field. These points (I’m sorry to say) are rather belaboured, despite being part of the story’s progression. (Or possibly I’m just saying that as an indoctrinated tool of the patriarchy.)

It’s a good sequel to The Surgeon. The characterisation is much better and more detailed, for example. Whilst you may not actually like the characters, they are far better developed this time around.

There is no strict need to read the first book for this sequel to be enjoyable. Well, as enjoyable as detective thrillers about serial killers can be.

Amazon linkies.

The Cuckoo’s Call

Annnnnd we’re back to detective stories ! Very good.

The Cuckoo’s Calling is billed as a Cormoran Strike (the lead character) novel. Perhaps this is going to be a series. I wouldn’t object. (That’s a hint (and summary) for the rest of the review, I guess.) This book was forwarded onto me, and so I came into it with no expectations. (Note: I have found out since that this will likely be a series.)

About the author: most of this review was written on the iOS WordPress app, with gaps left to fill in the details that I needed to look up. The author is listed as Robert Galbraith. Cool. That name rang no bells, so I read the book, and quite enjoyed the book. Wrote the review. Turns out Robert Galbraith doesn’t exist. Galbraith is a pseudonym for J. K. Rowling. Yes, that J. K. Rowling. Okay. Wow. I suppose that she doesn’t need much introduction. She, uh, wrote some books about a boy wizard, a book about depression, misery, and drug-taking in middle England, and apparently is writing detective fiction under a male pseudonym. There’s a quote, “Being Robert Galbraith has been such a liberating experience… It has been wonderful to publish without hype and expectation and pure pleasure to get feedback under a different name”, which I can’t link to the source, because it’s behind Murdoch’s paywall protecting the Sunday Times.

Cormoran Strike is a contradiction, like all good private detectives. He is physically imposing; large in all dimensions, somewhat brutish, and rather intimidating. This is paired with an incredibly sharp, disciplined mind, and some rather limiting personality flaws. He is ex-Army, physically disabled (these two facts are connected), and recently separated from his cheating, manipulative partner, and is living in his dingy office. His downward spiral is interrupted by Robin Ellacott, a temporary secretary that he can’t afford. Robin is enarmored by the work, but not by Strike himself. A former friend contacts him about the apparent suicide of his (the friend’s) half-sister, Lula Lantry. He is convinced it was murder, and despite initial reservations, Strike investigates. So far, so standard. However, the backdrop of London fashion, nightlife, wealth, and power provide an interesting flavour to the story. Very few of the characters are particularly likeable, with their flaws being highlighted as part of their motivations and character.

It is difficult to discuss the book without talking about the finer details of the story. I don’t want to spoil the narrative, which is one of the biggest issues with attempting to review detective fiction.

I’m in two minds about it: when I was reading it, I found it excellent. The following day, still excellent. When I was first thinking about this review, trying to pinpoint some of the reasons I rated it highly, I struggled. In retrospect, the characterisation was a highlight. There were excellent description passages, the story weaved together nicely, and the dialogue was definitely a notch or two above what is average for this genre.

The denouement is well-done. All of the pieces were there if you had been looking for them. If you were an aficionado of the genre, you may have thought that they were laying it on a bit thick. However, hindsight is always 20/20, so maybe I’m being unfair there.

It’s a good example of modern British character-driven detective fiction. I quite liked it, even if I seem to be unable to quite articulate the reasons why.

Epilogue: I wrote all of that before I know who the author was. I think I still stand by all of it.

Buy the book using these links! (For some unknown reason, Amazon isn’t allowing the link to the Kindle page. It’s available on Kindle, as well as dead-tree editions.)

The Cuckoo’s Calling (Cormoran Strike)

Two for the Dough (Janet Evanovich) (Stephanie Plum 02)

And so the misadventures of Stephanie Plum, New Jersey’s accident-prone bounty hunter not-quite-extraordinaire, continues. This is the second novel in the series, the first was reviewed here.

As previously introduced, Janet Evanovich is an American crime writer. Wikipedia, personal page, and Amazon. She started off as a romance writer under a pseudonym, but came to fame when she moved to crime, winning several awards.

Stephanie Plum, is a fugitive apprehension agent, more excitingly known as a bounty hunter. Kenny Mancuso, a cousin of Plum’s love interest, Joe Morelli, has failed to appear for his court date, and is proving difficult to track down. He has just been discharged from the army, is suddenly flush with cash, and has just shot his best friend. Spiro Stiva, a childhood friend of Mancuso’s, is a sleazy mortician, who hires Plum to retrieve stolen military coffins, and later hires her as his personal bodyguard to protect himself from Mancuso’s incredibly erratic and violent attentions. (There is a particular scene that will make all male readers wince. Certain things should not be posted through the mail is all of the hint that I’m going to give.)

To assist with the investigation of funeral parlours and the business of death, Plum’s completely barmy grandmother (throughout referred to as Grandma Mazur) is enlisted to provide cover. This is a task that she utterly fails at, with Grandma Mazur causing chaos and mayhem wherever she goes. Early-on, Grandma Mazur is an interesting foil to Plum’s activities, but her time in the spotlight should be limited, since as a character she isn’t particularly well developed. Some of the charicaturisation that was lurking in the background in One for the Money is far more evident in Two for the Dough, an issue that becomes far more prevalent as the series continues. (I was going to say develops, but that implies change. Actually, it’s a little harsh to say that, the books are distinguishable, even if the characters become a little set in their ways.)

Joe Morelli provides a much better counterpart to Plum’s hijinks, and assists nicely with the plot development. Ranger, bounty hunter extraordinaire and mystery man, doesn’t have much of a role in this novel, but turns up occasionally to move the story along.

The showdown is well-written, and the story moves along at a nice clip. It’s light and easy-to-read, and shouldn’t be mistaken for more than it is. Judged on its own, it’s a decent light crime novel. Judged with respect to the rest of the books in the series, it’s more of the same. In small doses, that’s not a bad thing. However, it’s entirely possible to have too much of a good thing.

Obligatory Amazon Links

Actually, I’m a little cross at Amazon at the moment, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, their MP3 store is excellent, but is geographically locked to the US. I’m not in the US, and therefore can’t access the store. Damn. Second, they locked my account last night, much to my frustration. However, they have an automated callback system thing, and I talked to an actual person quite quickly to get it unlocked. For that, I’m actually quite impressed.

Two for the Dough isn’t available on Kindle, but there is a box-set of the first three Stephanie Plum novels here: Plum Boxed Set 1, Books 1-3 (One for the Money / Two for the Dough / Three to Get Deadly) (Stephanie Plum Novels).

One for the Money (Janet Evanovich) (Stephanie Plum 01)

There are some authors who are the literature equivalent of a weekend away. They are easily digestible, low-stress, don’t require a lot of higher brain function, and are fine in occasional doses, but you wouldn’t want to do it too often. Janet Evanovich and the Stephanie Plum books fall squarely into that category for me.

Author in brief Janet Evanovich is an American crime writer. Wikipedia, personal page, and Amazon. She started off as a romance writer under a pseudonym, but came to fame when she moved to crime, winning several awards.

One for the Money is the first story in the Stephanie Plum series, which as of writing has nineteen primary titles and a variety of holiday-themed one-offs. It’s a little difficult for me to review, as I’ve read most of the series, and am quite familiar with the characters and the format of the books. (They might be just a little bit formulaic. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, as it ties in with the weekend-away idea from above. They’re light and fluffy and able to be swallowed in a few days. Colin Forbes is another really good example of this, but to a greater extent. I’m sure that he does a global search-and-replace of a few words from title to title.) Back to the point: I’m going to try to balance what I know about the series as to what one might expect encountering the series for the first time.

The character cast is quite static: Stephanie Plum is a rather hopeless bounty hunter who muddles through a series of desperate situations. Joe Morelli, a Trenton New Jersey cop, is her occasional boyfriend and love interest, and spends a lot of time rescuing her from desperate situations. Ranger, an expert bounty hunter, is the third part of the triangle, and plays to the other side of the law than Morelli. Lula, who in the first novel is introduced as a prostitute, will become Plum’s useless off-sider who should be working at filing at the bond office. Plum’s family provide a range of secondary characters: the sleazy cousin for whom she works, the long-suffering stereotypical ethnic father who harumphs over the crazy situations, the worrying mother, and the kooky grandmother who has a fascination with Plum’s line of work, and in particular the weaponry. Character development doesn’t really occur after the first few books.

One for the Money sees Stephanie Plum broke and in employment troubles. She blackmails her cousin Vinnie to give her a job rounding up Failure To Appears for his bond agency. Joe Morelli has skipped bail on a charge of murder, and is hunted by Plum. Up-and-coming boxer Benito Ramirez is connected with the killing, and is a particularly nasty piece of work, having raped and mutilated women, only to have his fame save him. Unable to apprehend Morelli, Plum forms an uneasy alliance with him to take down Ramirez. The writing is fast-paced, the scenes are quite well-written, and the story is a bit darker and grimmer than later books, with far less slapstick.

It’s light, it’s fluffy, it’s easily digested. But be careful–it’s a little addictive. An easy-to-read book from an easy-to-read series.

Oh, and it’s now a film.

Amazon links

One for the money doesn’t appear to be available on Kindle, but there are a variety of dead-tree editions, including an omnibus: Plum Boxed Set 1, Books 1-3 (One for the Money / Two for the Dough / Three to Get Deadly) (Stephanie Plum Novels)